867

Louis Lot

7816

Paris, France

Stamp: On headjoint, engraved: L.L / LOUIS LOT / PARIS / 7816 / BREVET� . Engraved (not stamped) on body: L.L / LOUIS LOT / PARIS / BREVET� . (No second period for L.L on either stamp).

Marks:

Manufacture Date: Made in 1908 (Giannini). The proprietor was E. Chambille.

Hallmarks: Hallmarked on lipplate with boar's head and diamond maker's mark, ' H#V". Bottom tenon of body and base of footjoint tube hallmarked with two swan stamps, indicating import of silver to France after 1893 (flutes, even of French origin, appear to have been stamped as import, possibly when brought into France by expats). Replacement crown and cork facings hallmarked, "W S ", apparently for William Simmons (http://www.willysimmons.co.uk/).

Comments: This flute has the big, bold sound of the plated Lots, with plenty of texture and control. A very fine player. The fact that this flute was built to play at A=440 (the headjoint is uncut, and set at this pitch), coupled with the "Swan" hallmark of importation to France, suggest that this was made for a foreigner.

Material: This curious flute is made of plated mechanism, silver body and foot tubes, plated headjoint tube, and silver lipplate. The springs are of blue steel. The tubes appear to me to be seamless; others (including the owner) differ. It was just at this time that seamless tubes were first seen in France

System: This is a modified model 7, silver and plated flute with C foot. Bb trill.

Condition: Other than the usual signs of use, and the replaced crown and cork, this instrument appears to be in excellent original condition. Modest repair work has been done over the years, including a tiny bit of replaced tubing on the upper C# rod.

Pitch: This flute plays very nicely at A=440. The scale is the typical Lot scale, and the headjoint does not appear to be cut (certainly not by 5 mm), suggesting that it was made with a slightly shorter headjoint tenon than usual.

Sounding Length: Sounding length 600 mm.

Measurements:

Weight: 382

Case: In new case.

« Go back