LOUIS LOT
#8220
PARIS, c. 1912

LOUIS LOT #8220 PARIS, c. 1912

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972

Louis Lot

Paris

Stamp: On headjoint, engraved: L.L / LOUIS LOT / PARIS / 8220 / BREVETE . Engraved (not stamped) on body: L.L. / LOUIS LOT / PARIS / BREVETÉ . (No second period for L.L on headjoint stamp, no accent on Breveté on headjoint, yes to period and accent on body).

Comments: Chambille, who had been foreman since 1882 when Debonneetbeau took over, obviously promoted someone else to become foreman, since many elements of this instrument show a new hand, such as the loss of the tapered edge to the lipplate flange, and a new design of the ring edge, especially seen on the headjoint and lower body rings, and the last ring on the body before the barrel, yet one well practiced in the Lot shop. The keywork has perhaps a bit more obvious precision, and the upper C# touch now has a ""C"" shape arm attachment underneath, showing that Chambille was definitely putting his mark on his flutes. The Dorus G# is very precise in it's movement, which gives a smaller, almost unnoticeable push for the little finger, compared to the usual side G#. Although this can be awkward at first, this is one of the best made of the Dorus G# keys we have tried. This flute plays with a beautiful and clear tone, very easy intonation, and a lovely and warm feeling. It gives a noble entrance to the 20th century, with touches of the past in the Dorus G# and the clear, rich tone, yet elements of the future, with the .013"" seamless tube, which seems to add brightness. Indeed, it is the brightness, along with absolute clarity and excellent pitch, which give this flute a very special and desirable quality.

Material: Made of silver with silver lipplate. Crown is replaced, but looks silver. Pad washers all original, and of white metal.

System: This is the model 5, silver flute with C foot, from the Lot price lists. This instrument has a Dorus G#, surely one of the last ones made. The trill is to Bb, and the tube is seamless.

Condition: This flute is in excellent original condition. The principle signs of use and wear come from repair work in the distant past. The crown and cork arrangement are new. The instrument appears to have been but modestly used.

Pitch: The scale is 227 mm, the classic Lot A=435 scale, yet the sounding length is 598 mm, fully 7 mm shorter than the 435 Lot. The flute appears to have been made this way, and plays at A=440 with an exquisite scale. Plays very nicely and in tune at A=440.

Sounding Length: Sounding length 598 mm. Typical length for A=440 is 600 mm. A=435, the old Lot scale, is 605 mm.

Measurements: C# to bottom of foot 366 mm. Emb. 10.19 x 11.75 mm. Bore at bottom of headjoint 18.8mm.

Weight: Weighs 408 grams.

Case: In probably the original case.

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Photographs (click to enlarge):

Chambille carried on the tradition of the
Chambille carried on the tradition of the ""L dot L"" stamp on this beautiful flute from c. 1912.
The sturdy right hand keys made from the heady days of Hennebains.
The sturdy right hand keys made from the heady days of Hennebains.
The lovely and elegant trill key reaches over the perfect F, with the tail of the Dorus G# in the rear.
The lovely and elegant trill key reaches over the perfect F, with the tail of the Dorus G# in the rear.
The center of the flute looks naked without a side G key, and the Bb rod seems unusually long and lonely, yet this is very close to the original French ideal.
The center of the flute looks naked without a side G key, and the Bb rod seems unusually long and lonely, yet this is very close to the original French ideal.
Here we see the Dorus G# in all its glory.  This is a grown up key, with the maturity of experience.  The key has strength, character, and strong springs.
Here we see the Dorus G# in all its glory. This is a grown up key, with the maturity of experience. The key has strength, character, and strong springs.
The dual action of the Dorus springs means a strong spring on the right is pushing the keys up.  The spring on the left goes from the hanging clutch in the middle, which is connected to the A key on the right.  The left end of this spring is inserted into the tail of the G# and is pushing the key arm gently onto the hanging clutch.  The G# therefore travels with the A, but once closed is independent, and can rise with the G# touch.
The dual action of the Dorus springs means a strong spring on the right is pushing the keys up. The spring on the left goes from the hanging clutch in the middle, which is connected to the A key on the right. The left end of this spring is inserted into the tail of the G# and is pushing the key arm gently onto the hanging clutch. The G# therefore travels with the A, but once closed is independent, and can rise with the G# touch.
This beautiful treatment of the two strap-ends at the trill keys is a tribute to Chambille's obvious love of his workshop.  It was here on the flute that Villette first broke his bonds as a student, and changed his master's design.  The beautiful relationship created here between the two straps is a tribute to both Louis Lot and to Villette, in absolute harmony.
This beautiful treatment of the two strap-ends at the trill keys is a tribute to Chambille's obvious love of his workshop. It was here on the flute that Villette first broke his bonds as a student, and changed his master's design. The beautiful relationship created here between the two straps is a tribute to both Louis Lot and to Villette, in absolute harmony.
Perhaps it is the embouchure that gives these flutes their magic.  This one is no where near symmetrical, which we would call an
Perhaps it is the embouchure that gives these flutes their magic. This one is no where near symmetrical, which we would call an ""after lunch"" embouchure were this flute from Debonneetbeau. Here it is as anomalous as a Dorus G# on a seamless tube! It was a special cut, at any event.
One of our favorite hidden gems on a flute is the choice of the maker for their arm attachment to the C# touch.  Here Chambille has changed the V introduced by Villette and used by his successors with a
One of our favorite hidden gems on a flute is the choice of the maker for their arm attachment to the C# touch. Here Chambille has changed the V introduced by Villette and used by his successors with a ""C"" shape. Chambille had made his mark.