967	H. Bettoney	Serial #1025.

967 H. Bettoney Serial #1025.

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967

H. Bettoney

Boston., USA

Stamp: Stamped on all joints: "H. BETTONEY / BOSTON, MASS.", on upper body additionally stamped "1025".

Comments: Susan Berdahl's 1986 dissertation relates the development of flutemaking in this firm, which began with Edward Wurlitzer making flutes as a young man in Saxony, also making flutes for Berthold in Stuttgart. Assuredly, Wurlitzer brought a closeness to the work of Boehm to America unenjoyed by the other American flutemakers. This instrument is very heavily based on Boehm and Mendler's work, such that the few minor changes would be easier to relate than the similarities. For example, the strap is less delicate, the pillars too. The footjoint rollers are more streamlined. Similarities include everything about the flute, down to the exact way Mendler made the G# key, on top and underneath. This is a very lovely instrument. Boehm and Mendler were making very similar flutes towards the end of the 19th century, and this instrument shows a direct connection to the German tradition through the Wurlitzer family, who remained in charge of flutemaking at Bettoney's at least to 1952. Even though these flutes were not as delicately hand made as Mendler's flutes, they have a very successful style of their own.

Material: Made of grenadilla wood with silver keys and trim, gold springs. The screw cap may be a composite material.

System: This is Bettoney's model 1000 wooden flute, seemingly made around 1920 (Berdahl).

Condition: The condition of this flute is excellent, with minor wear. There is a repaired crack in the front of the head.

Pitch: Seems to be pitched at A=438-440.

Sounding Length: Sounding length 607 mm.

Measurements: Embouchure 12.09 mm x 10.65 mm. 456

Case: In old wooden case.

Removed.
Price: $2,800

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Photographs (click to enlarge):

Bettoney hired Ed Wurlitzer from Saxony to come over and run the flutemaking business.  Wurlitzer copied the flutes of Boehm and Mendler, just as the Haynes brothers had done back in the 80's and 90's.
Bettoney hired Ed Wurlitzer from Saxony to come over and run the flutemaking business. Wurlitzer copied the flutes of Boehm and Mendler, just as the Haynes brothers had done back in the 80's and 90's.
The Wurlitzer family didn't need Badger or the Haynes brothers to show them how to follow Boehm and Mendler.
The Wurlitzer family didn't need Badger or the Haynes brothers to show them how to follow Boehm and Mendler.
This handsome flute shows how flutemaking develops from common sources.  The marriage of traditions which took place in New York was avoided here, and the design of Boehm and Mendler was adopted almost in its entirety.  This instrument is well made, if not to the jewell-like quality of Boehm and Mendler at least a fine American version.
This handsome flute shows how flutemaking develops from common sources. The marriage of traditions which took place in New York was avoided here, and the design of Boehm and Mendler was adopted almost in its entirety. This instrument is well made, if not to the jewell-like quality of Boehm and Mendler at least a fine American version.
Here we see the full strap at the trill keys, showing a somewhat humorless practicality.	The French thumb keys (
Here we see the full strap at the trill keys, showing a somewhat humorless practicality. The French thumb keys ("the thumb like Louis Lot" was Theobald Boehm's description of this key) with a touch of tenderness in the upper and lower lips, accented by the sturdy double-screwed flange at the lower pillar.
The tender humor in this curved two-piece backclutch mimics the curve of the G# cup.
The tender humor in this curved two-piece backclutch mimics the curve of the G# cup.
This sturdy Bettoney flute has rested in this wooden case for many years, although I doubt it is original.
This sturdy Bettoney flute has rested in this wooden case for many years, although I doubt it is original.