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920

Wylde, from Rudall & Rose (left handed)

London

Stamp: On midjoint: (Royal Arms) / WYLDE / FROM / RUDALL & ROSE / 25 VILLIERS ST. / STRAND / LONDON; the same without arms on the foot. The head and heart are marked: WYLDE / LONDON.

Comments: This instrument has inspired impressive efforts to keep it playing. The curious cracks up the midjoint and the headjoint are as unusual as the left handedness of the instrument, and suggest some unlikely event, rather than a gradual overuse, which is nonetheless also possible.

Material: This left-handed flute is made of lovely dark brown cocus wood, with 7 silver keys. Springs of brass, double springs of steel. C & C# plugs of pewter. Crown and barrel appear replaced, the barrel possibly with the original silver fittings. Embouchure with silver lip guard, possibly a later addition.

System: Left handed 7 keyed flutes are rare, and this instrument has been zealously guarded, and nursed back to health many times.

Condition: This flutes many stories will remain largely untold, but they are legion. Most visibly full lengthwise cracks are pinned in the headjoint and the midjoint. The embouchure has been only modestly adjusted, compared to the Guichard, for example. Other repairs have been to the footjoint shoulders. Some left handed flute player is looking for this flute, to carry on a rich and possibly sacred history.

Sounding Length: Sounding length 587 mm.

Measurements: Embouchure 10.2 x 11.6.

Weight: 422 g.

Case: In wooden case contemporary with the flute.

Sold.
Price: $3,125

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Photographs (click to enlarge):

This is the 25 Villiers St. address, used by Wylde 1838-1852.  These were the glory years of the 8 keyed flute in London, and it is not a surprise that Wylde should have been asked to make a left handed flute.
This is the 25 Villiers St. address, used by Wylde 1838-1852. These were the glory years of the 8 keyed flute in London, and it is not a surprise that Wylde should have been asked to make a left handed flute.
These are the sturdy, well produced keys, and precise, intentional toneholes, of one of London's great flutemakers.  Everything is backwards, or forwards, depending on one's point of view.
These are the sturdy, well produced keys, and precise, intentional toneholes, of one of London's great flutemakers. Everything is backwards, or forwards, depending on one's point of view.
As we approach the footjoint, we see the broad and bold touches of an established maker, and the graduated toneholes of the Nicholson flute.
As we approach the footjoint, we see the broad and bold touches of an established maker, and the graduated toneholes of the Nicholson flute.
Either Wylde really stepped out with the curves on this barrel, or it is a later replacement using the original silver hardware.
Either Wylde really stepped out with the curves on this barrel, or it is a later replacement using the original silver hardware.
Here is the most curious part of this flute.  Something happened, and someone wanted this flute back strongly enough to have this pin job done.  Even stranger, something happened to the headjoint as well, which is also pinned (and illustrated later).  This is an heroic effort to keep an old friend on the field.
Here is the most curious part of this flute. Something happened, and someone wanted this flute back strongly enough to have this pin job done. Even stranger, something happened to the headjoint as well, which is also pinned (and illustrated later). This is an heroic effort to keep an old friend on the field.